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Archaeology In The News 7

04 Nov

http://www.livescience.com/56695-ancient-egypt-boat-tableau-discovered.html

More than 120 images of ancient Egyptian boats have been discovered adorning the inside of a building in Abydos, Egypt. The building dates back more than 3,800 years and was built near the tomb of pharaoh Senwosret III, archaeologists reported.

The tableau, as the series of images is called, would have looked upon a real wooden boat said Josef Wegner, a curator at the Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania, who led the excavation. Only a few planks remain of the wooden boat, which would have been constructed at Abydos or dragged across the desert, Wegner said. In ancient Egypt, boats were sometimes buried near a pharaoh’s tomb.

 

http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/rare-1200-year-old-gold-coin-discovered-in-lower-galilee/2016/11/01/

A rare gold coin dating back to 8 CE, has been unearthed in an excavation taking place in Kafr Kana in the Lower Galilee, the Israel Antiquities Authority reported Tuesdsay.

The coin was found by two teenagers who were volunteering at the dig, which was being carried out prior to construction of a parking lot in the town.

The 1,200-year-old coin is inscribed with Arabic writing that speaks of the Prophet Mohammed and monotheism, according to the IAA.

The Authority’s coin expert, Dr. Robert Cole, said the coin was extremely rare, commenting, “The excitement from the find is not only with the students but also the archaeologists. It is rare to find a single gold coin in an excavation.

“It is interesting to know that such a gold coin, for a simple man, was a lot of money,” he said. “One dinar was worth more than 100 pounds of grain, and with four and a half dinars, he already could buy a house in the village,” said Cole.

 

https://www.thelocal.se/20161102/divers-find-hundreds-of-unopened-bottles-on-mystery-shipwreck

Diver Jerry Wilhelmsson was out looking for a different shipwreck altogether off the south coast of the Åland islands (Finland’s autonomous Swedish-speaking islands between Stockholm and Helsinki) when he came across an incredible discovery. Sitting in front of him at a shallow depth was an unusually well-preserved 27 metre long shipwreck, complete with anchor, figurehead and hundreds of unopened bottles.

Wilhelmsson and his diving team Baltic Underwater Explorers now have permission to take some of the bottles back up to the surface in the hope that analysis will provide an explanation for where the mysterious wreck came from.

“It’s quite rare to find a wreck in this condition with cargo intact at a relatively shallow depth,” Magnus Melin of Baltic Underwater Explorers told The Local.

“The coolest thing must be the cargo hold with all the bottles. But the whole relatively small wreck, which has a figurehead, is very interesting. To me, the ship itself and its (currently unknown) story are the most interesting things.”

 

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/ancient-inn-complex-unearthed-in-assos-.aspx?pageID=238&nID=105381&NewsCatID=375

Archaeological excavations in the ancient city of Assos, located in the northwestern Turkish province of Çanakkale’s Ayvacık district, have unearthed an inn complex.

Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Archaeology Department Professor Nurettin Arslan said works this year mostly focused on Byzantine era ruins in the inner parts of the ancient city.

“In these excavations, we unearthed the ruins of a complex that could be considered an inn complex. The existence of this complex is mentioned in ancient sources but it has never been unearthed. The inn, where people were accommodated and patients were treated, is located behind the western gate,” said Arslan, who has been head of the excavations for 10 years.

“The complex has its own bakery, kitchen and cisterns. All the needs of visitors were met there. At the same time, there is a chapel for people to pray. Ancient resources from the Byzantine era provide information about the inn but none of them defined this structure and its location,” he added.

“If we are not wrong, thanks to the artifacts we have found we will be able to shed light on this structure: how it was operated, how many sections it had, and how they served. For example, finding more than one marble table in a room would should us that people dined there. Finding a small chapel would show that people were able to worship in the inn. There is more than one cistern and water well, as well as kitchens.

There are also many accommodation places connected to each other but no archaeological excavation has been able to locate such a structure. That is why we are sure we have unearthed a Byzantine-era structure,” Arslan said.

he ninth annual conference on archaeological discoveries in Jerusalem and its environs that was held at the Hebrew University this week revealed the existence of an ancient Muslim inscription testifying to the fact that the original name of the Dome of the Rock, Qubbat al-Sakhrah, was “Beit al Maqdis” بيت المقدس — “Beit Hamikdash” in Hebrew, aka the Jewish Temple — during the early Muslim era, Makor Rishon reported Friday.

According to archaeologists Assaf Avraham and Peretz Reuven, the inscription is dated to the 10th century CE, about a thousand years ago. It is located above a mihrab-prayer niche inside an active mosque in the village of Nuba, located seven miles north-west of Hebron. It is unknown when it was placed there, but it certainly throws a fresh light on the process by which Jerusalem became holy to the Muslims and the inspiration that Islam drew from Jewish sources regarding the holiness of the Temple Mount compound and the Jewish temple that once stood at the spot where today stands the Dome of the Rock shrine.

 

http://www.livescience.com/56653-hebrew-papyrus-seized-from-looters.html

A rare, 2,700-year-old papyrus with Hebrew script that had been looted from a cave in the Judean Desert has been seized in an elaborate operation by the Israel Antiquities Authority, archaeologists announced today (Oct. 26).

However, a professor at George Washington University has provided information to Live Science indicating that the papyrus may be a sophisticated modern-day forgery.

The papyrus’ Hebrew text translates as: “from the king’s maidservant, from Na’arat, jars of wine, to Jerusalem,” the capital city of the Kingdom of Judah, according to a statement from the Israel Antiquities Authority

 

http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/discovery-jerusalem-on-hebrew-papyrus/2016/10/21/

 

A unique, 2,700-year-old Papyrus which mentions the Hebrew word “Yerushalma” (possibly meaning “to Jerusalem”) will be revealed next week at a conference on Innovations in the Archaeology of Jerusalem and Its Environs, at the Rabin Jewish Studies Building on the Mount Scopus Campus of the Hebrew University, Makor Rishon reported. Researchers say the papyrus may be the earliest evidence in Hebrew of the connection between the city of Jerusalem and the period of the Kings of Israel.

The papyrus is a document written on paper made from the pith of the papyrus plant, cyperus papyrus. Such documents were written on sheets of papyrus, joined together side by side and rolled up into a scroll, in an early form of a book. In a dry climate, like that of Egypt or the Judaean desert, the papyrus pages are stable, since they are made of highly rot-resistant cellulose; but storage in humid conditions can result in molds attacking and destroying the material.

To date, the only other archaeological find that mentions Jerusalem in Hebrew were carvings on a cave wall at the Beit Loya ruin near Amatzia in southern Judea (west of the green line). The cave, which has been dubbed the “Jerusalem Cave” was excavated in 1970, and the writing on the wall says, “The whole land and the Judaean mountains are His, the God of Yerushalaim.” Prof. Shmuel Achituv, a scholar of the history of the people of Israel in the ancient East, deciphered that text and has now also deciphered the papyrus with the word “Yerushalma.” He will lecture on his discovery at next week’s lecture.

 

http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/excavation-reveals-spot-where-romans-breached-jerusalems-wall-2000-years-ago/2016/10/20/

Exciting evidence of the breaching of the third wall that surrounded Jerusalem at the end of the Second Temple period was uncovered last winter in the Russian Compound at the city center. The discovery was made in an archaeological excavation the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted in the location where the new campus of the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design is slated to be built. In the course of the excavation, archaeologists discovered the remains of a tower jutting from the city wall. Opposite the tower’s western facade were scores of ballista and sling stones that the Romans had fired from catapults at the Jewish guards who were stationed at the top of the tower.

According to Dr. Rina Avner and Kfir Arbib, excavation directors on behalf of the IAA, “This is a fascinating testimony of the intensive bombardment by the Roman army, led by Titus, on their way to conquering the city and destroying the Second Temple. The bombardment was intended to attack the sentries guarding the wall and provide cover for the Roman forces so they could approach the wall with battering rams and thereby breach the city’s defenses.”

The historian Josephus, an eyewitness to the war, provided many details about this wall. According to him, the wall was designed to protect the new quarter of the city that had developed outside its boundaries, north of the two existing city walls. This quarter was named Beit Zeita. The building of the Third Wall was begun by King Agrippa I; however, he suspended its construction so as not to incur the wrath of Emperor Claudius and to dispel any doubts regarding his loyalty. The construction of the Third Wall was resumed some two decades later by the defenders of Jerusalem, as part of fortifying the city and the Jewish rebels’ preparations for the Great Revolt against Rome.

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Posted by on November 4, 2016 in academics, archaeology

 

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