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Formerly Fundie Is At it Again

16 Sep

The owner and author of that website has several posts that are in desperate need of addressing. While we should use a separate post for each, we will lump them all together here and hit the highlights.

#1. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/formerlyfundie/jesus-created-marijuana-and-it-should-be-legal/

I think it’s time that Christians in America had a refresher course on a few things instead of just blindly swallowing the same old narrative they’ve been trying to scare us with. Unlike what Franklin Graham is urging Christians to do, I am urging Christians to adopt a biblical worldview when it comes to marijuana.

Marijuana is not some strange, synthetic compound cooked up in you neighbor’s basement. It’s not some new thing they invented in the 80’s that sounds good at first, but then destroys all the lives it touches. Marijuana is not something God sits on the throne grieving over.

Instead, marijuana is something that was created by Jesus himself, that God declared to be good, and that God granted us permission to consume

First everyone knows that marijuana is a mind altering drug no matter if it is harmless or not so a biblical world view should not be one of acceptance and tolerance. Plus why should Christians oppose their nations’ laws which make marijuana illegal? That author presents no real reason for them to protest against their governments’ restrictions.

To say that Jesus created it so we must be in favor of it is absolutely absurd. Jesus created the ingredients to make bombs, poisons and mustard gas, etc. Should we take a ‘biblical’ world view and declare those items are okay as well? Then that author must have missed the verse ‘gird up the loins of your mind’ (done from memory) so since God wants us to have clear minds that do not let evil in, he must grieve about those who alter their thinking abilities with drugs.

God may have created poisons, we cannot be sure if he created them or if they and drugs were a result of the sin and corruption that entered the world at Adam’s sin.He doesn’t want us taking poison so we can rest assured that he does not want us taking illegal drugs no matter how popular they become.

So, here’s where accepting the inspiration and authority of Scripture lands us: Jesus created marijuana, it was created with a good purpose in mind, God declared it to be good, and God gave us permission to consume it.

In which world does calling something good equals granting permission? God called sea water good yet we cannot drink it, so the quoted logic is just ridiculous.  That author has lost all sense of biblical reality once he left the faith and joined progressive Christianity.

#2. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/formerlyfundie/keeping-drugs-illegal-just-makes-it-all-worse-its-time-to-think-differently/

The war on drugs is a failure– because as with most things, making something illegal doesn’t make something go away. (To test this theory, just tell a 2nd Amendment supporter that you want to ban guns, and they will explain it to you.)

The ‘war’ on crime is also a failure should we make rape, murder, pedophilia and other crimes legal? Again the logic is not supporting the statement. What that author forgets is that God gave people the right of free choice and given that the Bible teaches that ‘man loves darkness rather than light’ it is no wonder that the war on drugs is not stopping illegal drug use.

When we deal with spiritual reality we see the truth of the issue and stop blaming the laws and see that evil comes from people choosing to do sin or break the law. Laws do not over-rule free choice but provide guidelines on what is acceptable or not in society and each society is free to change those laws if they so choose. The real reason why illegal drug use has not gone away since the war began is because of the sin nature in people and how easy it is to manipulate and influence people to do sin over good.

Then just because people do not stop breaking the law it does not mean that we stop fighting crime or illegal drug use. Some people think that laws are supposed to have a perfect record before they can be determined successful. All that thinking does is show how naive people are and how misplaced their faith is. Laws are not going to be the force that stops illegal drug use or criminal behavior only Jesus can do that when he redeems people.

This is a fact that the author of that website misses

I don’t know how else to spell it out for you, so let me be as direct as possible: What we are doing isn’t working.

Sure it is working because mot people are not participating in illegal drug use or criminal behavior. That author is looking at the wrong statistics to draw his conclusions.

#3. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/formerlyfundie/would-a-righteous-god-torment-people-in-hell-for-eternity/

After leaving Christian fundamentalism, I shed off a lot of previously held beliefs– some of them were beliefs quite central to my faith. One of those core beliefs I ended up letting go of was a belief in the traditional version of hell that exists in much of modern Christianity.

Why? Jesus believed that hell exists he spoke about it

https://www.biblegateway.com/quicksearch/?quicksearch=hell&qs_version=NASB

so why should we contradict him?

Let’s look at the concept of righteousness. At its core, the word simply means to perfectly do what is right or just. In this regard, no one is arguing that God does what is less than good, less than right, or less than just. In fact, one of the reasons I no longer believe in traditional hell is because of God’s righteousness, not in spite of it. If even a sinful, deeply flawed, human parent would never even consider throwing their child into flames to be tortured, I cannot fathom how God– the one Jesus claimed was the perfect parent– would do that, either.

He provides the right answer for himself then just ignores it. God is acting perfectly when he sentences people to hell for he warned everyone of the consequences of sin. If he didn’t send unrepentant sinners to hell then he would not be righteous but violating his word

If your hand causes you to stumble, cut it off; it is better for you to enter life crippled, than, having your two hands, to go into hell, into the unquenchable fire, Mark 9:43

Jesus is pretty clear that people are going to be sent to hell so that author and others should listen to the bible instead of their own logic

The book of 1 John reveals this to us quite plainly, stating that “God is love.” Notice it doesn’t say that God is loving (describing an attribute) but says that God is love, which is describing a core essence. This core essence of love becomes the starting point for discussing all other attributes of God– if God is love, then every action by God is loving. Thus, before any discussion on what is righteous, we must first ask, “What is loving?”

That author forgets that love punishes and that the punishment means the one who loves will hurt more than the one being punished. Sending people to hell doesn’t mean that God is not loving but that he must send them there for their sins merit such punishment. It would not be loving to all those who obeyed the rules if God did not punish as he stated he would.

So that author only looks at the issue from one side and forgets that loving applies to more than those who sinned. It applies to those who obeyed God as well. How is it loving if God alters the rules for the unrepentant sinner?

But I would counter with this: When you affirm belief in the traditional view of hell, you most likely are ignoring the love of God.

No, we see that love carries out the prescribed punishment because that is the just and righteous act to carry out. That author seems to ignore justice in his argument against the existence of hell.He forgets that being loving means one has to be just and how is it unjust by carrying out the declared punishment for unrepentant sin that everyone knew about for millennia?

If you are going to talk about God’s righteousness then you need to include in the discussion God’s justice. He will carry out his justice perfectly which means unrepentant sinners will be sentenced to hell. God’s righteousness does not over-rule God’s justice but works with it even when people are sent to hell. Notice that the Bible does not list several levels of punishment or that it assigns certain sins to specific levels. It talks about being sent to hell or the lake of fire only. Let’s not change God’s punishment without biblical evidence to support that alteration.

#4. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/formerlyfundie/how-christian-fundamentalism-is-making-a-concerning-comeback-in-america/

The original fundamentalists stem from the early 20th Century, and was rooted largely in fear– fear over this new concept of evolution, fear that culture was growing too liberal, fear that the nation was drifting from God, and fear that it would all come crashing down if they didn’t take culture back.

No not the definition of being afraid but a fear of what will happen to a people and nation if they continue their disobedience to God and his ways. They saw and learned from what happened to ancient people who did not repent and they did not want that same punishment to fall upon their country. There is no new fundamentalism, it is just getting braver as they believe time is short and they want more people to make it into heaven.

Those who do not believe in a real hell, sin, evil etc., do not understand the whole scenario thus they distort the beliefs and actions of those who do understand. When you get rid of sin, right and wrong, hell and so on then you do not grasp the severity of the situation and laugh at those who do. It isn’t about same-sex wedding cakes but calling evil good. People like that author miss the point and distort the issue but then what can you expect from those who give up God’s ways for alternative beliefs?

We need more people to proclaim the correct standards of right and wrong, morality and immorality, good and evil so people can understand why some people take sin seriously.

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Posted by on September 16, 2016 in academics, Bible, church, comparative religions, controversial issues, faith, leadership, theology

 

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